Fail with a Smile

Scared to try? It’s difficult to pin down the exact origin of the ‘do not fail’ culture in schools. Did schools simply replicate the industrial model where the wrong result would mean lost profits? Was it the growth in competitive school structures and league tables that encouraged teachers to only point students directly to the ‘right’ answer? It doesn’t really matter, we just need to remove the fear culture asap!

600px-Stop_signTHE EFFECTS OF FAIL FEAR

Fear of getting it ‘wrong’ makes students:

  1. Not engage
  2. rely too much on teacher input
  3. not experiment or challenge ideas
  4. not value their own thoughts (correct thoughts will be provided)
    .

image: Wikimedia

Fear of things going wrong makes teachers:

  1. Never challenge their own practice with something new.
  2. Not enhance practice with digital tools.
  3. Not encourage peer observation.
  4. focus students only on the ‘right’ answers and not on the purpose behind learning.
  5. restrict students to only the activities and technologies that their teacher is confident in.
  6. not learn from the kids !

Moving beyond the fear is a cultural shift that needs to be explicitly explained to both students and teachers. I am fortunate that I work in a school that encourages individuals to experiment and fail. Even within this environment, many of my colleagues still tread carefully and worry about any new initiatives having adverse effects. This fear of things going wrong is dangerous because it always reduces what a teacher will accept as learning activity in their classroom and thus restricts students from personalising their approach, feeling they own their own learning and thus kills intrinsic engagement.

Here’s a slide I start many of my units with:

 

Fail-n-Smile

“Let go of the fact you don’t know what you’re doing, ‘cos you’ll have to hack it all along the way” - Alexis Ohanian

Here’s the Reddit creator explaining that he’s always worked on-the-fly and and made it up as he goes along. This should be seen as a positive way to work and will be needed more as the speed of development around the world increases.

Learning and Adapting

Why failing must become the norm.

The world is changing fast. Technology is changing quickly too and the speed of change will increase (See Shanghai below!). Over the next 50 years, occupations will come and go and learning and adapting will become the key skills for everyone trying to survive and develop a career that will last.

Please make failing a good thing in your classroom and allow your students to fully engage with your programme without fear holding them back. For example, when it comes to using iPads, set clear criteria and demands but benefit from the true potential of the devices by allowing students to present their learning in the format that suits them best. Ensure they are presenting their work to an audience other than just the teacher and have an explicit dialogue about the probable failures in this freedom and that the class will all learn from each other’s failures.

shanghai 1990 2010

Image: io9

 

How PD can make real change

scared_UserWriting blogs like this one and interacting with teachers on Twitter and the like can make edtech teacher types, like me,  forget that it is still the case that the majority of teachers are not confident or regular users of modern technologies (social, mobile & student-centred) and need effective introduction and explanation of their benefits. I would estimate this majority of the non-confident to still be around 80%.

I have been Head of Department in my current school for just one year and a number of my teachers have highlighted recently how far they’ve come in just one year. I thought I’d share my approach to providing PD and why it might be that it seems to work (well, some of it)

THREE QUESTIONS:

  1. Why does so much Professional Development NOT work?
  2. Why do schools make such slow progress with modern workflows compared with business?
  3. Why do some teachers refuse to budge from their tried and trusted methods?

FIVE COMPLAINTS

  1. “PD’s never to do with how I teach”
  2. “I always forget PD because I don’t use it immediately”
  3. “PD’s a waste of my time”
  4. “It’s always too much to take in”
  5. “I’m not confident with using technology in my teaching”

COMPLAINTS CAN BECOME SOLUTIONS

Choose an Tech-coach Teacher to work one-to-one with others and give them time to do it
Make PD to do with an individual’s current teaching – Don’t introduce an unrelated “new-way”
Give them a reason to use it immediately
Provide the PD at a time that suits the individual
Provide PD in small but frequent sessions
Confidence grows slowly, so only take small steps from current practice

SOLUTION ?

Every student is an individual and so is every teacher.

Providing standardised Professional Development to groups larger than 10 is just as effective as trying to teach a standardised curriculum to classes larger than 10, that is to say, not effective at all. The biggest missing piece in so many PD jigsaws is a reason for each individual to ‘develop’ in that way. As well as a professional reason, each individual will be looking for a personal benefit too. Some non-edtech teachers will need small conveniences added to their current practice.

HOOK THEM IN FIRST

hookMy trick is to always emphasise the personal benefits or conveniences such as time-saving, less admin or increased popularity with students to the teacher before explaining any professional or pedagogical benefit. In addition to this, by mostly working with individuals, I can also add an immediate use for the ‘development’ by looking at the specific teacher’s current teaching programme. This gets them using it for a number of days after the session. If they feel there’s a personal benefit, they’re more likely to give it a proper go. The professional and educational benefits will be truly realised in time and the teacher will be proudly trumpeting those, whilst possibly keeping the personal liking for it more quiet.

Photo Credit Link

KEEP IT SIMPLE – SMALL BUT FREQUENT. STEPS MAKE BETTER PROGRESS

When I’m working with a teacher, I only work with something they are currently doing and try to reduce the development to 3 points or even 3 clicks if I can. I also ensure I only ever cover one task that they are currently doing but show how it can be developed to be easier, quicker or more popular with the kids.

LINK THE STEPS

chainI try not to jump around topics and tools between sessions. Try to link all the small steps together. For example, moving to Google Drive is good for this as steps are taken within one account and the format is similar throughout the Google eco-system. Google Drive is also enough like an old PC but introduces the use of Cloud storage and can then link to increased iPad use through the Drive app and thus mobile workflows.

If you jump from one topic to another, teachers can’t picture how all the ideas and tools link in different ways to their current practice. This is particularly evident with training that focuses on app after app. Most apps are isolated tools that might be great but when piled upon each other with all their various features, can overwhelm and produce little progress. This happens even if an app is covered each week or so. In the first 3 years, build a plan for how a limited number of apps will work together in the long term.

Photo Credit Link

HAVE A BACKBONE

Any school or edtech team should have a planned set of apps or eco-system that together get all the basics done. This plan can be ignored or added to by the more confident teachers but acts as a core safety net for the less tech-minded. These basics are:

  • Sharing
  • Collaborating
  • Photos
  • Video
  • Text
  • Project organisation
  • Filing
  • Animation
  • Drawing
  • (I’m sure you might have others)

Many teachers I work with have often wished they’d just been told one way of doing things whilst other colleagues have enjoyed playing with a variety of apps. So providing a core eco-system is important to get everyone onboard.

Building basic confidence in tech use is the first hurdle for many teachers.

AN EXAMPLE

My Step 1: “Don’t worry, the new way is like the old way”
helpCreate a department Google Account to log all the non-technical people into on both iPads and laptops. Demonstrate the easy dragging of Word and Powerpoint files into the Drive and how it acts like an “old” computer.
Then show how the docs appear immediately on the iPad App. This worked well for our Apple TVs as I needed a wireless way to present all their normal files. The apps and browsers log in permanently, so no password remembering and They only had to remember that dragging worked.

Photo Credit Link

Step 2. “I have a great reason to start using this”
“I’ve canceled the next meeting!” When I said this, they loved that I had freed up their time but you can trade that off against having to comment inside a Google document where all the questions, topics and discussion takes place over a week, when they each find time. Their browsers and iPads will already be logged in so emailing the doc link gets them all straight in.

Step 3: “We need to reduce the workload for all”
Indicate that sharing the same Google file structure means they can all use the same files and replication and movement of copies between teachers comes to and end. Groups of teachers can then add to the same files. This also works well for school or department policy or admin files that can be completed by the whole team, reducing workload further.

Step 4: “Explain Everything but just with photos and a laser”
The only standalone app I introduced was Explain Everything. Non-technical, traditional teachers could see it’s worth as again it only recorded what they’ d always done. The trick was reducing the app to just 2 features:

  1. This is how you add a photo/screenshot to a slide,
  2. This laser lets you point at stuff.

The videos will go to the same google/YouTube Account so no further passwords.
Don’t mention Flipped teaching yet as it scares/annoys many teachers. In fact stay away for edtech vocabulary all together. :-)

Step 5: “Stop! That will do for year 1″
Let teachers master 3 things each year and the school will have far more overall success. If all teachers in any school were using Google services and Explain Everything, it would be a real leap forward for most schools.

THREE ANSWERS

  1. Professional development often fails by forcing too much too quickly, not giving personal/human reasons for shifting and not personalising it to individuals’ current needs.
  2. Schools move slower than business because they lack the financial / survival incentives to change. Schools should work with personal incentives to encourage change. Educational incentives are a worthier cause but in reality, teachers are human before they are idealists.
  3. Some teachers have habits developed over decades, so don’t try to change them but show how what they do can be done more efficiently and save them time. This will start the long road to change.

SAMR + Design Masterclass

Happy enough…

I’ve always been happy that I could visualise ideas for others and have had fantastic feedback from my readers, particularly in that area. Thanks readers! But…

Back to the drawing board

I also know when I’ve been outclassed by a talent on all levels. Below is a ThingLink poster that itself contains interactive elements to fill anyone with a complete understanding of the SAMR model for integrating Technology in the classroom. The fantastic Lisa Johnson (@TechChef4U) has combined knowledge, resources, (one of them’s even mine), and a flare for design to produce a toolkit for educators to start understanding where to go with technology integration.

This has inspired me to up my game further and definitely start using ThingLink properly!
I’m also jealous that her site looks so slick too.

The WordPress rules are blocking the interactive bits so checkout the ORIGINAL:

Here is the excellent design work that embeds on any site with the link in the top corner. Thanks Lisa!

SAMR success is NOT about Tech

Quick refresh

If you aren’t aware of the S.A.M.R. model (devised by Ruben R. Puentedura – @rubenrp) then in simple form it explains the common journey teachers go through when introducing technology. It’s popular for introducing iPads in schools. More info here.

Quick version:
Substitution: Do old paper task on device
Augmentation: Do old paper task digitally but now using an extra app feature
Modification: Students benefit from the versatility and combine new digital tools for new outcomes
Redefinition: Students are collaborating and learning in ways previously not imagined

Slow Progress

Even in my school, the speed at which the staff as a whole move through the SAMR model from substituting tasks for their digital equivalent to redefining how they help students learn is slow, sometimes seeming to stall completely. My school is good at providing professional development but after 4 years the conversations by tech leaders contain the same frustrations.

i4S SAMR Mindset

New Focus

I was thinking today that I had to make it clear that competency with technology is not the first issue you should worry about if you want to make SAMR progress. The issue to tackle first is the teaching conventions and mindsets amongst the staff, and for this you need some pretty simple and effective arguments.

So here are some I’ve used to move staff on a little:

1. Question the effectiveness of “Teaching/lecturing”

The aim of lecturing is that all leave the room with identical understanding. All teachers, secretly or not, know this has never been true but you are guaranteed to have to repeat information to the “bad listeners” and simultaneously waste the time of the “top” students who already know the material. Students listen at different levels and understand at different levels, something quietly ignored by many teachers.

2. What’s your strategy to ensure your students can cope & learn without a teacher?

Many teachers who moan about students’ inability to “think” are often expecting them to arrive at the same conclusion as themselves and thus attempt to painstakingly guide them to that very same point. This teaches kids to rely on well-rehersed guidance and not seek their own understandings. Employers and universities then complain that too many applicants seem to lack independence and drive to solve their own problems.

3. Can you tell me your course content is more important than other courses?

No matter what exists or is important in 10 years (the world seems to be changing quickly for some), students are guaranteed to need independence, willingness to help, imagination, teamwork, digital skills for staying connected, problem solving strategies and confidence. I believe that any course content is only a tool to achieving these far more overarching skills and mindsets. If students develop these, any content or learning becomes more enjoyable and thus seems more manageable and they will connect with what is appropriate at the time.

4. If you deliver your course, they’ll only ever check the mailbox to learn something.

Be less definite & ambiguous with your questioning. This makes it harder but kids are resilient and allowed freedom in how they tackle problems independently or in teams will develop the skills that so many feel school fails to encourage, and in some cases kills.

Learning the tech side of things comes quickly when teachers can see a reason for doing so. This is achieved when old habits are shown to be less effective in the modern context and that change is a must and not an option. Keep your teaching colleagues questioning their own habits and connecting with each other to collaboratively design active, student-centered learning spaces.

The “One iPad” Classroom

ipad04 005

If you have been allocated just one iPad for your classroom then you have very different issues to 1-to-1 classrooms as the iPad is not designed as a shared device. But don’t despair! There are apps for that!

I’m never one to push for the downloading of numerous apps as it clouds the workflow. The core skills of handling and organising information,  images and creative output from each student as the device gets passed around should be a first concern. Students like to have their own space to save things.

There are always a number of ways to do anything on an iPad but the organising and separating of student work on one device can be very easily organised with 2 cloud accounts:

  1. Evernote – Writing – Drawing – Images – Audio – screenshots
  2. Youtube – videos (including lessons)

The passwords can be kept by the teacher and students needn’t worry about the account itself. The material saved can also be managed from the teacher’s laptop for both accounts.

YouTube-for-iOS-app-icon-full-sizeThe camera, iMovie & Explain Everything apps can all be permanently logged-in to the Youtube account. This is important as video is the primary storage killer. Video is the new pen and once an iPad gets into the classroom the opportunities for recording evidence, performances and reflection mean the organisation of video becomes important. These videos can be stored as privately or publicly as needed.

evernoteEvery student can record their own work, including material from other apps within their own Evernote Notebook, all held and synced to the same  account. Evernote allows students to record web content, writing, images and record audio notes and arrange all that into folders of topics etc.

.

penultimate_icon_256Penultimate is Evernote’s Sketchbook app. It allows students to add photos and screenshots freely onto unlimited pages and freehand draw on them. It also obviously allows for freehand drawing and has a choice of 4 paper types. These sketchbooks auto sync to the Evernote account. This means it’s also viewable by the teacher from their laptop.

This setup creates a cloud classroom for the teacher to monitor 24/7 and also caters for all the basic tasks that students might already be doing.

Below is my usual style summary of the apps and the roles they play in the classroom. It certainly acts as a solid starting point for collating and organising a class’s output. It also gives each student a place of their own on the shared device.

Here’s 2 PNGs that link to PDFs:

Page 1:

i4S-1-iPad-Classroom

Page 2:

i4S-1-iPad-Classroom-pt2

.

Why iPad 4 Schools [Poster]

Decision Making?

If you need something short and sharp to convince decision makers on why it should be iPad and not an alternative, this poster might help. Laptops and Chromebooks make excellent business tools for those writing documents, sending emails and using Skype (not available for Chromebook) but for creative options in schools, it still has to be iPad.

iPad 4 Schools Poster

New Year: iPad First 5?

After getting lots of positive feedback about a visual interpretation I did of a blog post by Holly Clark (@HollyEdTEchDiva), I also had a small number of requests and suggestions for other ideas that would be ideal for a visual summarising. I’m currently working through them but one came from the talented Beth Holland, who let me know she was writing a post for Edutopia.com based on the theme of “First 5.” This idea can be applied to many scenarios and asks experts to consider what one might do in the first 5 minutes, 5 days and 5 weeks when introducing a new initiative or technology. I loved the idea and got to work immediately. Here’s the result and I hope it helps some classrooms get going in the new academic year.

iPad First 5

iPad Responsible Use

POLICY FOR THE VISUAL LEARNER

My school had a list of responsibilities in regards to using iPads in school.  So I set about producing a visual version and recently tweeted it to a Tweep friend. The Tweet was popular and got a number of RTs. So I’ve re-titled the slides for general use and here’s the full PDF version you might want to use in your school.

Click image for separate slides PDF file.

iPadWells Responsible Use

Teachers who just got iPads

83006d6bd421cf420a2fd1aa1e0329eeI had the privilege of holding a Google Hangout with Holly Clark (@HollyEdTEchDiva) and Tanya Avrith (@EdTechSchools). It was a great chat, where we compared US, NZ and Canadian school systems. Afterwards I was checking out Holly’s stuff and came across her great introduction to iPads in Classrooms. I checked with Holly and she was keen I do one of my visual representations of the ideas. So here it is, my visual, albeit briefer introduction for teachers who just got iPads:

Holly Clark
EdTechTeacher.org

9 Starter Tips for Teachers Who Just Got iPads
PNG (No links – 1mb)   PDF (Links – 2mb)

Teachers New to iPads

Parents’ Role in Mobile Learning

Guest Writer Reese Jones (UK)

Parents are giving their approval stamps on the use of modern technology inside the classrooms. The presence of devices has breathed a new life to the otherwise routine of the students. But, of course, there are ways on how to purchase the right device for your kid. Participating in a survey, parents have voiced out their views on mobile learning.

  pic1b

Some rights reserved by americaspower

The Popularity of Wireless Technology

Family members these days own mobile devices, from elementary students to teenagers have a gadget in their hands. These children know how to look for great mobile deals. They search websites like O2 Learn to look at the latest trends or news about the newest release device model from different manufacturers.

According to information from PCMag:

  • 56% of children ages 8 to 12 have their own cell phones
  • 39% of children ages 2 to 4 have used mobile devices
  • 54% of those whose age ranges from 5 to 8 are familiar with using mobile devices
  • 70% under 12 know how to use mobile phones.
  • 23% of teenagers aged 12 to 17  are now using smartphones
  • 77% of them have cell phones

These school-aged children know how to use their mobile devices to enhance their learning experience.

  • 70% of teens use their mobile devices as a resource to complete assignments
  • 72% of sold iTunes educational apps are geared towards preschool and elementary students

Because of this number, parents and school administrators think that the learning process is now fast becoming digital.

  • 77% of parents think that the tablets are beneficial to their children
  • 74% of school administrators feel that digital content increases student engagement
  • 600+ school districts have replaced textbooks with tablets in the classroom

pic2b

Some rights reserved by thomcochrane

Parents’ Views on Mobile Learning

Those who have seen the effects of mobile learning on their children agree that the use of mobile devices can contribute to the development of a child’s skills. Living and Leaning posted these results on their website.

  • 71% of parents believe that mobile devices help expand learning opportunities
  • 77% of them agree that these devices promote a child’s curiosity
  • 74% see the value of the equipment in educating their children about current events, both local and global.
  • 63% believe that these devices are another way of teaching children problem solving skills
  • However, some parents still voice out their concerns about the apps being used. They believe that 69% of these are “purely entertainment”

Parents as Partners in Technology Education

Overall, parents are supportive of the way education is moving forward in schools. They are the resource that schools need in order to bring more devices in the classroom. 56% of parents have reported that they are willing to shoulder the expenses to give their children smart devices to used in school.

Parents would be most appreciative if they are involved in the mobile learning success of their children. They want educators to communicate with them regarding the policies that they have in their classrooms. This helps them to reinforce the best practices that teachers have in their classrooms. Hand in hand, parents and the members of the academy can use these advancements to the advantage of their students.

Let us know if you are ready to take education to the next level.  Start a discussion below on why you agree or disagree with mobile learning. We value your role in building our community.

About the Author

Reese Jones is a specialist in web design, computer art, mobile handsets and fashion in technology. She is also a keen drummer, avid follower of Edudemic and Ipad4schools.org. Tweet her @r_am_jones